527 Physics, Earth, and Space Science

2 semesters, 1 credit

Required for sophomores not taking 528 Advanced Physics, Earth, and Space Science

This course has the following objectives: provide the student with the essential tools necessary to conduct scientific queries and analyze results and to develop a life-long interest in science. The major topics include metric system and scientific notation, dependent and independent variables, and the general principles of physics, earth, and space science. This course will utilize computer simulations and laboratories to supplement classroom lecture.

Skills

By the completion of this course, students will be able to…

  1. Apply the principles of physics to the study of the interaction of matter and energy.
  2. Make sense of scientific processes incorporating logic and reasoning.
  3. Understand the properties of matter and the changes that matter undergoes.
  4. Comprehend the structure of the Earth and the processes at work both above and below the Earth’s surface.
  5. Develop an understanding of the composition of the universe.
  6. Use scientific principles to improve society.

 

Knowledge

By the completion of this course, students will know…

  1. Systems of measurements, including metric and SI
  2. Operations involving significant figures
  3. Laws of motion associated with equations
  4. The properties of matter and the changes that matter undergoes
  5. The structure of the Earth and the processes at work both above and below the Earth’s surface
  6. The composition of the universe
  7. How to use the periodic table to make predictions about the behavior of atoms 
  8. The interaction between objects and forces
  9. The connection that exists between all forms of energy 
  10. The changes that have altered the surface of the Earth 
  11. The cause and results of climate change 
  12. The relationship between natural resources and energy 
  13. The life span of the Sun and how it releases energy
  14. The life cycle of a star

 

This curriculum last updated January 7, 2019, by the Science Department.